Admire the strange bridges in the world

Completed in 2005, the Coil Bridge in London, England, is 12 meters long and spans the Grand Union Canal in the Paddington Basin area. As the name suggests, the bridge can bend, curl to the side when ships and boats need to circulate. Photo: Reddit.
Completed in 2005, the Coil Bridge in London, England, is 12 meters long and spans the Grand Union Canal in the Paddington Basin area. As the name suggests, the bridge can bend, curl to the side when ships and boats need to circulate. Photo: Reddit.
"Eight pieces of steel and wood are assembled by hinges so that they can be rolled up until the two ends of the bridge touch, forming an octagon," said Koen Kas, a businessman from Belgium. He said that every Friday afternoon, the bridge "tumbles" for the crowd to admire. Photo: Heatherwick Studio.
“Eight pieces of steel and wood are assembled by hinges so that they can be rolled up until the two ends of the bridge touch, forming an octagon,” said Koen Kas, a businessman from Belgium. He said that every Friday afternoon, the bridge “tumbles” for the crowd to admire. Photo: Heatherwick Studio.
Located at an altitude of 200 m and with a length of 20 m, the Shaharah Bridge is located in the district of the same name in Yemen. Some say the bridge was built in the 17th century by a local lord. However, others share that this building was built in 1905, during the reign of Imam Muhammad Yahya Hamid ed-Din. Photo: Getty.
Located at an altitude of 200 m and with a length of 20 m, the Shaharah Bridge is located in the district of the same name in Yemen. Some say the bridge was built in the 17th century by a local lord. However, others share that this building was built in 1905, during the reign of Imam Muhammad Yahya Hamid ed-Din. Photo: Getty.
Achilleas Vortselas, a mechanical engineer, said: “No modern bridge can compare with the charm of traditional stone arch bridges. Stone arch bridges often show the resilience of humanity. Humans overcome physical obstacles, even by modest technical means. The Shaharah Bridge in Yemen is a great example of that.” Photo: Shutterstock.
Achilleas Vortselas, a mechanical engineer, said: “No modern bridge can compare with the charm of traditional stone arch bridges. Stone arch bridges often show the resilience of humanity. Humans overcome physical obstacles, even by modest technical means. The Shaharah Bridge in Yemen is a great example of that.” Photo: Shutterstock.
Instead of using conventional materials, the root bridges in the village of Cherrapunji (India), known as one of the wettest regions in the world, were built using exposed roots of red banyan trees. Photo: 123RF.
Instead of using conventional materials, the root bridges in the village of Cherrapunji (India), known as one of the wettest regions in the world, were built using exposed roots of red banyan trees. Photo: 123RF.
Accordingly, people use bamboo tubes to keep the roots growing in a certain direction. The bridge can be more than 30 meters long and strong enough for 50 people to pass at the same time. Photo: Getty.
Accordingly, people use bamboo tubes to keep the roots growing in a certain direction. The bridge can be more than 30 meters long and strong enough for 50 people to pass at the same time. Photo: Getty.
Langkawi Sky in Malaysia is a pedestrian cable-stayed bridge 125 m long, 1.8 m wide and 660 m high atop Gunung Mat Chinchang in Pulau Langkawi island. When building this bridge, people had to transfer materials to the top of the mountain by helicopter and it took many years to complete the construction system. Photo: Getty.
Langkawi Sky in Malaysia is a pedestrian cable-stayed bridge 125 m long, 1.8 m wide and 660 m high atop Gunung Mat Chinchang in Pulau Langkawi island. When building this bridge, people had to transfer materials to the top of the mountain by helicopter and it took many years to complete the construction system. Photo: Getty.

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